Monthly Archives: January 2015

The Best Part of Any AngularJS Troll Post

Any time I see the latest “I Hate AngularJS and So Should You” article I always skip straight to the end because that’s the very best part of all of them. It’s the fun part where we get to hear what the author of this particular piece is going to advocate you use instead. Here are the usual suspects and my highly uncharitable response to each one:

I’m writing my own framework now

Bonus points for this one if it’s accompanied by a link to their new half formed idea on Github. It should continue getting commits for at least a couple of months.

There are literally dozens of front-end frameworks at this point, but theirs is going to be way better than any of them. Look, there’s really only one or two guys who will work on it, but they are stellar programmers. God knows they are going to do a much better job than programmers at Google, Facebook, or the likes of Yehuda Katz and Tom Dale.

TodoMVC is beginning to look like one of those four page resumes you get these days with all of the “frameworks” that they have examples for. If you don’t believe me, be sure to look at their “Labs” tab. Yes, they have so many they had to put in tabs.

Backbone.js

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha hahahaha haha ha ha ha ha. Oh god. I may have hurt myself. This person is so upset about how “heavy weight” AngularJS is and “complex”. Look for lots of mentions of how things should be “minimal” and “simple” and at least one mention of how many lines of code Backbone.js is vs. the object of their derision. I figure their house looks like this:Form_Gable_House5

I did Backbone.js for two years, that’s why when I went somewhere new I put them on AngularJS instead. I really hope the people who advocate going back to Backbone.js have to work on a large team of mixed skill level developers. The unskilled ones will make a hash of any framework but what they can do with Backbone.js is just amazing.

That New Framework That You Just Heard About on Hacker News Two Weeks Ago

This is the framework from author #1 above. It’s going to solve all the ridiculous mistakes that AngularJS made and probably all of those from the other major frameworks as well at the same time. Ultimately it won’t get anymore updates, but that’s OK because it only got used on one project before our author realized it not only had as many problems as the major frameworks but many many more. Plus it gives him/her an opportunity to tweet about the abandonment of this framework and the excitement for the next new one.

The Chinese Menu Framework

This is the idea that sticking together a bunch of different best-of-breed pieces to make your own framework is perfectly viable. Just pick something from columns A/B/C/D and start using it. You’ll find lots of people who can answer your questions, there are many books and videos for that particular combo of tech, and there are developers out there by the hundreds you can hire who will have no problem diving right into your projects.

Ha ha. I’m kidding. It doesn’t really work that way. Pick an arbitrary grab bag of stuff and maybe you’ll make some excellent choices. But you’ll have to live with that decision for quite a while. Even a less popular stack like Ember.js is going to get more third party support than whatever you decide upon for yourself.

Again, I council rationality

Above all, please do a quick experiment for me. The next time somebody tells you that AngularJS is a dead end and you can’t rely on it for years to come, ask them what they would have recommended back in 2013? Just two years ago. What set of stuff would they have advocated then that would be doing so well today and have this long lived future into 2017+ that wasn’t AngularJS? Backbone.js? I don’t know of anything.

My point is this, the front-end and JavaScript tech is changing at a rate way too high for anyone’s predictions about two and three years down the road to have a lot of merit. AngularJS seems like a reasonable bet to have done well and have lots of info available about migration from 1.X to 2.0 so at the moment I’m still on that path. In the meantime I hope to learn more about Facebook’s stuff to see if it gives me useful ideas or to see if I can incorporate parts of it into AngularJS (Flux seems interesting for instance and would likely slide into most of the frameworks). But the people who speak with such certainty about the future… Maybe they don’t see it as clearly as they think.

AngularJS is not perfect. I’m not about to say that it is. It has problems, over time they’ve been worked on and reduced. I’m sure if I went and picked up React/Flux/Relay/whatever (come on Facebook, give a name to your stack!) or Ember.js I’d see much the same things. Lots of great people are working on them and they have thousands of adopters. Most of the time for most projects it works pretty well.

If you’re having problems with AngularJS it may be that you need to learn more, look at some open source, maybe even pull in a mentor with more experience. Alternatively, if you’re struggling and you think you’ve put in more than enough effort, look at one of the major alternatives and see if it works better for you. I haven’t put in as much time on Ember.js but I’ve looked at Facebook’s offering and it is very different than what Google put together.

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