Monthly Archives: June 2002

30 Days To A More Accessible Website

If you do any webpages at all then you need to read 30 days to a more accessible weblog. It is not just about weblogs, it is about making websites more accessible to people out there with a huge range of disabilities including blindness, color blindness, inability to see small type, etc. Read it, follow it.
I’ve already started the conversion of this website (if you check the source you’ll notice I now have a DOCTYPE, language specifier and I’m using the new navigation links). Everybody will benefit from the better page titles I’ve got now and I’ve looked at my webpage to see what it would look like to people using a text reader like Lynx and to people who are color blind. I’ve also checked for things like Javascript links which could cause problems for people. I look forward to the rest of this series helping me create not only a better personal website but also filter what I learn over into other websites I work on periodically.

Signing Your WebStart Application

I’ve always used a self-generated key to sign HotSheet (currently my only Java WebStart application) but it has always bugged me that it had to pop up this horrific warning whenever somebody ran it or else I had to pop for an expensive key ($200 first year w/ $100 each successive year). But not anymore, now there are instructions for signing Java WebStart apps using a free key and you might even be able to turn it into a full-fledged signature with a little work.
I hope to follow these instructions soon to clean up my own application.
Just a follow up: I have since followed the directions and it does indeed work. If you try out HotSheet you’ll find that it no longer displays the alarming message it used to display and instead just asks for approval to run my app. Much better. Now if I can get Thawte’s “Web of Trust” to authenticate me I might be able to get it to show my name on the screen instead of theirs.

MPOGD

You get jaded. You think, “I’ve seen all there is to see on the world wide web,” or “I know pretty much all the stuff in the areas that interest me that are out there.” Then it’s like you find a whole lost tribe of people and they are living in your attic!
That’s how I felt when somebody asked about creating browser based games and then reeled off a set of names, none of which was familiar. The site MPOGD was mighty helpful though in helping show me just how much I was missing.
They have links, reviews, etc. for hundreds of turn based, text based, or otherwise just different multiplayer games out there. Lots of which sound really really cool. In the end I think I was able to help the person who wanted to know about how to write one, but first I needed a lesson of my own.